Any drone is going to be a handful when you’re first learning to fly it, but the makers of drones in this price range largely take the novice pilot into consideration with features that make the UAVs easier to handle. A feature called headless mode (which we cover below) helps you orient the drone, while multiple speeds enable you to start more slowly and gradually go faster as you gain more experience and confidence. Another feature, called one-key landing, can also save the day (and the drone) if your flight goes completely sideways.
The included 3.7V 650 when fully charged, offers about 9 minutes of flying time, and you only need about an hour to refuel. If you wish to have the drone in action for an extended period, simply purchase additional batteries. With the controller, you have up to 120m of control range, but reduced to just 50m when you activate the FPV mode. Even with this, you can still conveniently take videos at reasonable distances.  
Even if you have no good reason to justify buying one, you have to admit that drones are cool. Some are glorified tech toys, but most models we highlight here are fit for use in imaging and cinematic applications small and large. If you think you can use a flying camera in your next project, there's some good news—the tech has come a long way in a very short time. There are models on the market now that put earlier copters to shame in terms of video quality and stabilization.
HD video starts at the resolution of 1080p as a minimum. For all of these drones, the video is captured at the lower resolution of 720p, even when they claim to have HD cameras. The resolution of still images is always higher than the video. With still photos, the resolution can be as low as 1 megapixel (equal to 1000p) and that resolution is considered HD for still photos. 
The flying range is the distance the drone can go before you start to lose control of it. You’re not going to see a tremendous flying range with drones at this price, but there can still be considerable differences among models. These drones are generally able to fly from 15 meters to 100 meters or so. Buy a drone with the longest range you can afford to give yourself more flying and photo/video options.

For example, OPTI has a built-in Optiflow Sensor (a downward facing sensor), which functions by picking out the patterns on the ground to ensure that the drone maintains a straight position.  ATTI, conversely, works a bit differently. With the ATTI, the drone employs other techniques apart from the external sensors to keep the drone in the right orientation and altitude. Thus, the drone can hover in place, or drift slightly around with the wind serving as a push. You will also find a GPS in some drones, and they help the drone to maintain coordinated and precise flights and landings.


This drone is a good option for those looking to upgrade from a toy drone to something more like a professional racing drone. It comes with headless mode and flip mode. Plus, the remote is clearly labeled so even if you’ve never picked up a drone remote before, you know exactly what’s going on. It has a range of about 230 feet, plenty of space for a more serious race. It’s well balanced and can handle a little bit of wind.
As it is for every gadget out there, a buyer must set realistic expectations when buying a cheap drone (or other devices).  If you set expectations that are too high, chances of being disappointed ultimately are high, and this may ruin your drone flying experience.  Instead of the high standards, expect far less from the device and let it surprise you instead while providing you with so much excitement in the process.  You may consider buying a spare drone also.
Another big addition is Spark’s obstacle avoidance system. While the ability to sense and avoid objects is usually a feature reserved for larger drones, DJI went ahead and built one into the hull of the Spark. It’s not quite as robust as what you’ll find on the Phantom 4, or even the Mavic Pro, but it still serves its purpose, and helps you avoid crashes.
Unfortunately, this one doesn’t come with a controller, which means you’re forced to pilot Tello via virtual joysticks on a smartphone app: a control method that’s notoriously mushy and imprecise. The good news, though, is that Ryze built the drone with third-party peripherals in mind, so if you prefer to fly with physical sticks under your thumbs, you can pick up a GameSir T1d controller and link it to your bird. We think it’s well worth the extra $30 bucks!
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