The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.

You get up to 9 minutes of flight time, have a 640x480p camera, and video capabilities that lack audio as there is no microphone. You can do flips in the air at the touch of a button on the transmitter, and there is a button that lets you share a video on social media instantly. The LED lights located at the center of each propeller and the headlight are pretty useful for flying at night, too.

Our review is 100% neutral, we do not receive products, gifts, monetary assistance or help from any part of the company that produces these devices or from the marketing company we review. Our source of income is through the placement of ads, Google, and the affiliate commission. Here you will find the top-level breakdown of our 10 best drones under $100.

While it may be slightly more expensive than the previous drone we've already looked at, the Yanni Syma X5UW is quite possibly a top beginner drone currently on the market. As one of the few cheap drones with FPV capabilities, the Yanni by Syma is a great drone for the tech junkie and VR enthusiast alike. With its downloadable app, "SYMA GO", flying is both simple and fun. By drawing a route on the screen with your fingertips, the drone's autopilot will read it and follow the given path. This is possibly one of the best features of the Yanni Syma, as it is a drone that can be flown without the aid of a transmitter.

This is another very recommended drone which is under $100 dollars. This drone has gotten 5 star reviews and from USA toys which is one of the trusted manufacturer of cool toys. This is one of the latest version of UDI 818A drone with excellent features. This drone is one a huge discount with free shipping. Are you considering this drone as your best drones with camera under $100? Let’s get into the features.
One of the cheaper options for an autopilot drone is the Hubsan H501S. It doesn’t have as many camera features as some of the more professional drones, but it is still equipped with some great auto features. It comes with a 1080p HD camera and has automatic return, altitude mode, and follow-me capabilities. It’s small, compact size makes it good for traveling and you get an average of 20 minutes of flying which is great for the price you’re paying. While more professional drone features are missing, you’re still getting a nice drone for less than $300.
With headless mode, you don’t need to worry which way the drone is facing because your controller is the basis for the drone’s orientation. In other words, whichever way the controller is pointing is the way the drone is pointing. This will help you master all aspects of drone flight, and as such it is one of the top features that beginners should consider.
You can pair the Tello with a third-party gamepad controller, but it’s easy enough to fly using the simple, intuitive Tello app. Thanks to its link with DJI (the Tello’s flight controller is made by the drone manufacturer), it’s a great ‘first drone’ for kids or adults looking for a learner model to practice on before moving to a bigger quadcopter like the the DJI Mavic Air.
This drone is built for better photos: the camera is farther away from the propellors to prevent interruption; the Phantom maintained near perfect stability even in 5+ MPH winds; and the various flights modes, such as Follow Me, worked great for getting interesting shots. We only flew the drone to 240 feet in the air, but we could have flown it much further if we had better visibility.

One of the most useful features of this drone that makes it great for beginners is how stable it remains while in the air. It even has a no-tip function to allow for an even smoother fly. This is the best small drone for less than $100, for the beginner looking to experiment with a fast, versatile, and extremely smooth flying drone at a shockingly affordable price. It comes with a 2.4ghz transmitter, spare propellers, and a USB charging cable, charges in forty minutes, and offers a decent amount of flight time averaging out at nine minutes.
The Altair Aerial is our #1 Toy drone as well as FPV Drone, because it has an amazing 720p HD Realtime FPV setup with the Flyingseee App that comes free with the drone. If you’re looking for a racing FPV drone you’re going to want to spend $300 or more and find something custom made, but this FPV drone will definitely satisfy most flyers who are looking to spend $130.00 or less. The customer service offered by Altair is amazing, you can read more about it in our full review of this drone.
DJI’s control system is also fantastic. The revamped DJI Go app puts all of the camera’s advanced controls right at your fingertips. Shutter speed, aperture, and ISO can be adjusted with just a few taps, and focus can be set by simply tapping on the subject. With a setup like this, you don’t even need prior film experience or piloting skills to get professional-looking footage.
And now the bad news. You get what you pay for, and if you want an aerial video platform that can capture stunning footage, you need to be ready to spend some cash. Because drones are such pricey propositions, it pays to do your research before buying one. We've tested many of the ready-to-fly models on the market to determine what's important to look for, and the best models available.
This drone seriously has it all. It’s powerful. It’s portable. It can dodge obstacles autonomously. And to top it all off, it has a camera that produces some of the best-looking aerial imagery we’ve ever seen. Truth be told, you can get a lot of these features in the original (and still very good) Mavic Pro, but the Mavic 2 Pro just does everything better.
For both DJI drones, it's not necessary to go into depth about the basic functions, like take off, landing and navigating. You pay a premium, but these are definitely the top drones in the sky both because of their ease of use and extra features. On one battery, the Mavic flew for 21 minutes, in many different modes, speeds, and altitudes. The Tap to Fly feature on the Mavic was the biggest disappointment. The remote screen is too vague to simply place your finger where you want to go.
The JJRC H26WM is a great drone for beginners or those who want a casual drone to zip around with. The camera is pretty decent but nothing too fancy, so don’t expect the world from it. The maximum amount of flight time you can get is approximately 7 minutes, so having an extra battery is a good idea. The camera allows for 2MP in FPV which swings around in all directions.
As mentioned above, you will crash, and you certainly don't want to go home empty-handed. Having back-up propellers can make or break your day. Extra batteries are also a must. Current battery chemistry limits flight times to somewhere between 5 and 25 minutes for most amateur drones. Having plenty of charged spares means you can fly longer — though flying for more than 30 minutes straight can be fatiguing.
Blade itself says the QX is for intermediate pilots, but this is the ultimate beginner quadcopter that can probably take any user to all the way of some pretty advanced flying. In addition to this factor, it’s almost double the price of other Nanos, which are great in their own right, but the drone of this capability has an immense brand appeal and reflects the quality Blade has put into its craft over the years. Blade also offers a BNF or “bind and fly” version of the QX in case a purchaser wants to use it with their existing radio transmitter, and there are some value packs around that will give them spare props and extra batteries for a reasonable price. Although the drone in its act- is very nimble, it comes with special safe technology that decreases control input speeds and automatically hovers the drone so that it becomes perfect for someone just starting out. In fact, it’s even better than that. You can play safely, in contrast to that, once someone is ready to control the drone, the safe mode can be kept on but double the control rate, so it will start hovering and the drone is still automatic, but pitching, yawing, and rolling are much more responsive when the safe mode is enabled. In another mode, the agility mode the user will get the full, crazy manual experience. Here, the user will have to hover the craft, he/she will have to figure out flips and rolls. People can sometime complain that the prop guard design tends to hook on stuff, so there’s that, but the actual crash durability of the quad is pretty good, going by the people who have actually crashed it. So, to sum up about this drone, it is a drone with many promises to undergo with and the user will have many usage of the drone when they will be upon an interesting experience of running a drone on their own.

The Syma X5C-1 was our top pick for this roundup, for the reasons of stability, wind-resistance and just being a great all around quadcopter is this price range. The popularity of this model means you will be able find lots of spare parts and find more answers to problems when you have questions. That being said, all the models we reviewed here make for great drones and a good bang for the buck. We hope the information we provided helps you find the best drone under $100.


For video quality, we shoot a variety of clips at various resolutions and frame rates, including the maximum available. We film high contrast and low light scenes, along with close-ups of people to evaluate detail and skin tones. Special automated modes like DJI’s Quickshots are also tested. These uncompressed files are then evaluated on a calibrated monitor, along with the drone’s still photos. Stills are shot at maximum resolution and, if available, in Raw. We check for colour, noise and dynamic range, and also look at other shooting modes like HDR and panoramas.

For those looking for a basic done that has FPV camera capabilities that are still pretty decent, but at a fair price, the Hubsan H502S is definitely the way to go. There are minimal features, mostly just the GPS function, which is a nice touch that makes all the difference, and you get up to 12 minutes of flying time on a single charge. You also get Return to Home, Follow Me, one-key control, the whole set.
The other primary consideration is how the photos and video are stored after you take them. Drones with WiFi capabilities will work with your mobile device, letting you see and store media real-time on your phone. For those that don’t, you’ll store the media on the drone, usually on a microSD card. If this is the case, know how much storage the drone comes with and whether (and by how much) it can be upgraded.
Even if you have no good reason to justify buying one, you have to admit that drones are cool. Some are glorified tech toys, but most models we highlight here are fit for use in imaging and cinematic applications small and large. If you think you can use a flying camera in your next project, there's some good news—the tech has come a long way in a very short time. There are models on the market now that put earlier copters to shame in terms of video quality and stabilization.
A. Sadly, the list of places where you can’t fly it is going to be significantly longer, but in general, try to find an open area with no people around. Avoid residential neighborhoods, commercial areas, schools, events of all kinds, people, and airports (stay five miles away from these). Again, you’ll find more detailed information on the FAA website.
Even if you have no good reason to justify buying one, you have to admit that drones are cool. Some are glorified tech toys, but most models we highlight here are fit for use in imaging and cinematic applications small and large. If you think you can use a flying camera in your next project, there's some good news—the tech has come a long way in a very short time. There are models on the market now that put earlier copters to shame in terms of video quality and stabilization.
This guide will walk you through some of the features and capabilities you can expect to find in a drone under $100, in addition to some more general considerations when comparing UAVs. We also recommend several models, so you can spend more time learning to navigate around trees and less time worrying about finding a drone that matches your needs.

As mentioned above, you will crash, and you certainly don't want to go home empty-handed. Having back-up propellers can make or break your day. Extra batteries are also a must. Current battery chemistry limits flight times to somewhere between 5 and 25 minutes for most amateur drones. Having plenty of charged spares means you can fly longer — though flying for more than 30 minutes straight can be fatiguing.


There are various factors you should take note of when shopping for these particular machines. First, you need to check the control operating system to ensure that it’s easy and manageable to use. Basically, there are 3 main control functions you can choose from which include OPTI, ATTI, and GPS, though they all help in flight-stabilization and assistance they tend to do it in slightly different ways.
Uvify’s Draco HD racing drone wins our pick for the best racing drone for a few different reasons, but the first and most important is that it is modular and customizable. This means that you’re free to upgrade or swap any of the components (like the camera, the motors, the video transmitters, etc.) you’re free to. Don’t get us wrong — this sucker is outrageously quick and nimble even in its stock configuration, but being able to upgrade is crucial if you don’t want your racing rig to become obsolete in a year or two.
As it is for every gadget out there, a buyer must set realistic expectations when buying a cheap drone (or other devices).  If you set expectations that are too high, chances of being disappointed ultimately are high, and this may ruin your drone flying experience.  Instead of the high standards, expect far less from the device and let it surprise you instead while providing you with so much excitement in the process.  You may consider buying a spare drone also.
Drones with cameras have revolutionized the field of aerial photography. Getting that perfect bird’s-eye-view perspective in a photo or video is a lot safer when it doesn’t involve risking life and limb in an airplane or helicopter. Drones have also made it possible to get shots that are impossible for traditional camera setups – tilting and whirling quickly with 360 degrees of motion. Dronethusiast drone reviews is taking on the top camera drones on the market today so read on!
A. The law is a bit murky here in terms of licenses and registering of drones, and as such your best bet is to check local regulations and brush up on the latest requirements from the FAA. In general, you won’t need a license if you’re flying a drone recreationally and the drone weighs under 55 pounds. Anything heavier than that and you might need to register it. If you’re trying to earn money with your drone, you’ll need to be licensed. The FAA is more than willing to fine or even jail those who violate drone rules, so this is definitely not an area you should ignore.
One of the cheaper options for an autopilot drone is the Hubsan H501S. It doesn’t have as many camera features as some of the more professional drones, but it is still equipped with some great auto features. It comes with a 1080p HD camera and has automatic return, altitude mode, and follow-me capabilities. It’s small, compact size makes it good for traveling and you get an average of 20 minutes of flying which is great for the price you’re paying. While more professional drone features are missing, you’re still getting a nice drone for less than $300.
When a new pilot tries to jump into the radio controlled aircraft scene, they may be tempted by a more expensive drone and while more expensive drones are usually easier to fly and have excellent cameras, the fact of the matter is that an inexperienced pilot just isn’t ready for all that. They aren’t ready to pilot a large, heavy aircraft, one which could very easily break, cause property damage, or even injury to another person. The smart thing to do in this situation is find a drone within a reasonable budget, so you can learn how to fly. That’s why today we’re bringing you this detailed guide of the best drones under $100.
FPV, or ‘First Person View’, drones give you the best possible experience imaginable, giving you a front seat to the action. FPV works by having a camera mounted on the drone, broadcasting a live video stream to the drone’s transmitter, FPV goggles, or a smart device. You’re able to fly more precisely and gain better shots with an eye in the sky than you normally would from your view from just the ground.

While DJI may be the first name you think of when it comes to drones, it isn't the only game in town. You can also look at models from Autel Robotics, Parrot, PowerVision, and Yuneec. Others have dabbled in the consumer drone space and exited quickly—GoPro pulled its Karma after a rocky launch and poor sales, and 3D Robotics tried to get in with the Solo, but also gave up the fight to focus on the industrial and enterprise spaces.
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