The best drone that you can get right now is the DJI Mavic 2 Pro. Aside from the very similar Mavic 2 Zoom, no other drone on the market offers a better mix of performance and portability. Despite being highly compact and easy to throw in a backpack, the Mavic 2 Pro boasts some of the best specs and features in the biz — including a Hasselblad camera, omni-directional obstacle avoidance, and a flurry of automated flight modes. If you’re looking for a go-anywhere, film-anything drone that you can fit inside a backpack, then look no further.
While the Mavic 2 Zoom will still set you back £1,099, that is £250 less than its brother, which makes choosing between the two a tricky choice. While it lacks the one-inch sensor, 10-bit HDR video and adjustable aperture of the Pro, its image quality is still excellent and more than good enough for epic YouTube videos. That spare change could also be put towards a spare battery or a ‘Fly More’ bundle. Whichever way you go, the closely related Mavic 2 Pro and Mavic 2 Zoom are the best all-round drones you can buy right now.

Overall you can’t go wrong if you’re looking for in the toy drone section with something for a camera to play with. The HD 720p camera takes great video and pictures. The price is right at under $130.00 amazon, and really the customer service is the kicker. No other drone company we’ve spoken to has displayed such dedication to making sure their customers are happy.
Another big addition is Spark’s obstacle avoidance system. While the ability to sense and avoid objects is usually a feature reserved for larger drones, DJI went ahead and built one into the hull of the Spark. It’s not quite as robust as what you’ll find on the Phantom 4, or even the Mavic Pro, but it still serves its purpose, and helps you avoid crashes.
The Holy Stone HS100 is another budget-friendly autopilot drone. It has one of the shorter flight times at 15 minutes but is still equipped with headless mode, altitude hold, and one-touch takeoff and landing. This would be a good drone for beginner pilots who are just learning. It has a built-in 1080p, first-person view camera that can capture some great footage. Again, there aren’t as many advanced camera features like the more professional drones have, but the Holy Stone HS100 still makes for a great flight experience.
When taking all of the specifications of the Smya X5C1 Quadcopter in mind, it is a drone best suited for the true beginner as a good starting drone. It can also be for those interested in experimenting with some light photography, or casual indoor or night flying. Other than the short battery life, this drone has it all, and remains one of the best drones for anyone interested in seeing just what drones are all about. The Syma X5C-1 a great starter drone with a camera in our opinion. The Syma is also an excellent drone to learn to fly.
It’s good to have an idea of what you really want in these inexpensive drones before getting any of them for yourself, particularly considering that many people make impulse purchases of these drones over 50 due to their affordability and end up regretting later. Additionally, ensure that your device is equipped with all the necessary functions for easy flying, such as a dedicated remote control and updated operating software. Other factors to consider when buying the best drones under 100 (over 50) include the following.
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For those looking for a basic done that has FPV camera capabilities that are still pretty decent, but at a fair price, the Hubsan H502S is definitely the way to go. There are minimal features, mostly just the GPS function, which is a nice touch that makes all the difference, and you get up to 12 minutes of flying time on a single charge. You also get Return to Home, Follow Me, one-key control, the whole set.
The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.
For video quality, we shoot a variety of clips at various resolutions and frame rates, including the maximum available. We film high contrast and low light scenes, along with close-ups of people to evaluate detail and skin tones. Special automated modes like DJI’s Quickshots are also tested. These uncompressed files are then evaluated on a calibrated monitor, along with the drone’s still photos. Stills are shot at maximum resolution and, if available, in Raw. We check for colour, noise and dynamic range, and also look at other shooting modes like HDR and panoramas.
If you are a beginner just learning to fly with these cheaper drones, take your time to learn the controls by flying in a safe area that is a wide open space, with no wind, and no obstacles. At first, fly low to the ground until you can maneuver your drone correctly. Practice flying on a single battery charge and then let the drone cool down for ten minutes before flying more. 
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