Want to keep your budget below $300, we suggest you choose one of the Altair drones we recommend. Altair is a great company (learn about Altair) out of Nebraska and provides top notch customer service! Shop the Altair Outlaw which goes 1000+ meters and costs $279. Altair also offers the AA108 as a budget option at $129 and the 818 Hornet is a great mid range for ages 10-14 and $169.

Even if you have no good reason to justify buying one, you have to admit that drones are cool. Some are glorified tech toys, but most models we highlight here are fit for use in imaging and cinematic applications small and large. If you think you can use a flying camera in your next project, there's some good news—the tech has come a long way in a very short time. There are models on the market now that put earlier copters to shame in terms of video quality and stabilization.
The Cheerwing Syma X5SW Wifi FPV is our 5th best drone under $100 with Camera Live Video RC Headless Quadcopter with extra 2 batteries. Cheerwing is a product of the assembly line of Syma, easy to use and with a very affordable price. Cheerwing is also known for its boring name of Cheerwing Syma X5SWFPV Explorers 2 2.4 GHz is a mid-range drone, good for flying both indoors and outdoors. This drone is equipped with 4 Brushless motors, which feature coreless technology, prevents drone rotors from overheating during a prolonged flight. With regard to aerial photography, the Syma Quadcopter unmanned aircraft has a 0.3-megapixel image sensor that has real-time transmission technology. Remote felt as if he were holding the remote control of a glorified toy car, the RC of the drone still felt great to the touch. Also, we did not have any problems getting to the buttons placed on the outer end of the remote control. The top part of the remote control contains the phone holder, which, judging by its size, can contain a larger phone like a tablet. The central part that contains two bar-like controllers semi-coated, covered with a non-slip material, the central part also contains 2 buttons for the left and right direction.
Any drone is going to be a handful when you’re first learning to fly it, but the makers of drones in this price range largely take the novice pilot into consideration with features that make the UAVs easier to handle. A feature called headless mode (which we cover below) helps you orient the drone, while multiple speeds enable you to start more slowly and gradually go faster as you gain more experience and confidence. Another feature, called one-key landing, can also save the day (and the drone) if your flight goes completely sideways.
While DJI may be the first name you think of when it comes to drones, it isn't the only game in town. You can also look at models from Autel Robotics, Parrot, PowerVision, and Yuneec. Others have dabbled in the consumer drone space and exited quickly—GoPro pulled its Karma after a rocky launch and poor sales, and 3D Robotics tried to get in with the Solo, but also gave up the fight to focus on the industrial and enterprise spaces.
Many manufacturers mount cameras inside the body of the drone. This is acceptable for casual photography, but if you want more professional results, consider adding an external camera mount, or gimbal. Gimbals allow you to place your video or still camera in front of the drone body, away from the vibrating motor and rotors. Gimbals can swivel and pivot, providing you with additional control over your imagery.
When a new pilot tries to jump into the radio controlled aircraft scene, they may be tempted by a more expensive drone and while more expensive drones are usually easier to fly and have excellent cameras, the fact of the matter is that an inexperienced pilot just isn’t ready for all that. They aren’t ready to pilot a large, heavy aircraft, one which could very easily break, cause property damage, or even injury to another person. The smart thing to do in this situation is find a drone within a reasonable budget, so you can learn how to fly. That’s why today we’re bringing you this detailed guide of the best drones under $100.
Our review is 100% neutral, we do not receive products, gifts, monetary assistance or help from any part of the company that produces these devices or from the marketing company we review. Our source of income is through the placement of ads, Google, and the affiliate commission. Here you will find the top-level breakdown of our 10 best drones under $100.
Just like the 818 Hornet, the AA108 has a 720p camera and while the range (100 meters) and flight time (10 minutes) are slightly less than the 818 Hornet, you can’t go wrong for the $129.00 price tag. It is super easy to fly because it has altitude hold which maintains the drones altitude even if you remove your thumb from the control. Additionally it is stable and easy to control due to it’s 3 flight skill levels, 1 for beginners, 2 for intermediate and 3 for advanced.
This drone seriously has it all. It’s powerful. It’s portable. It can dodge obstacles autonomously. And to top it all off, it has a camera that produces some of the best-looking aerial imagery we’ve ever seen. Truth be told, you can get a lot of these features in the original (and still very good) Mavic Pro, but the Mavic 2 Pro just does everything better.
This drone is based on a design that is a few years old, so it does not have an altitude hold function. However, it does feature a headless mode and a one-key return to pilot function. It can also perform flips at a push of a button, which is fun to watch and perform. To help with orientation with night flying, this drone has blue LEDs at the front, and red LEDs at the back.
The drones we review are ready-to-fly models, so you can use them right out of the box. In most cases, you'll need to bring your own Android or iOS device to view the camera feed in real-time, but we've reviewed a few models that stream video directly to a remote control. We don't cover racing, industrial, or agricultural aircraft here—our focus is on aircraft intended for aerial imaging and videography.
The other primary consideration is how the photos and video are stored after you take them. Drones with WiFi capabilities will work with your mobile device, letting you see and store media real-time on your phone. For those that don’t, you’ll store the media on the drone, usually on a microSD card. If this is the case, know how much storage the drone comes with and whether (and by how much) it can be upgraded.
Often repainted and re-branded (sometimes at a much higher price) the Syma x5c is positioned at a competitive price for what you get in the box. For about $50+ shipping depending on where you order, you get the quadcopter itself, a transmitter, one battery, and a charger. Extra batteries are inexpensive and you’ll certainly want them if you plan to fly for longer than 6 minutes, but they charge quickly, which is nice. At 9 and a half inches diagonally motor to motor, its not small enough to fly indoors.
All of these multirotors include the essentials; a battery, charger, remote (more commonly referred to as a transmitter), and of course the quadcopter itself. All of these are controlled using a standard mode 2 style transmitter with the throttle on the left and adjustable trim settings. They all also handle using the same basic control scheme and the same basic auto-leveling flight mode, but much like a car, they all feel distinctly different to control.

There’s one other type of beginner that isn’t looking for either of those things. Some beginners just want a drone to take pictures and videos with. They need whatever drone they get to be easy to fly and have decent specs, but not break the bank. For those people, the DJI Spark is going to be the best option. There’s no reason to buy the other two drones I mentioned if you want to shoot videos and take pictures. The Spark is actually easier to fly than the Bugs 3 and Mambo FPV, so you don’t have to worry as much about the flying part.
The blade nano qx is the closest competitor to the Hubsan. Both of them are extremely popular for beginners, and both of them are loved by enthusiasts due to their modification capabilities and excellent flight characteristics. Repairs are easy, the motors have plug in connections so you don’t have to even solder if one goes out. The price on this one is a bit steeper than the others, running about $80 for a complete, ready to fly package, but you do get a more capable quadcopter.
The best drone that you can get right now is the DJI Mavic 2 Pro. Aside from the very similar Mavic 2 Zoom, no other drone on the market offers a better mix of performance and portability. Despite being highly compact and easy to throw in a backpack, the Mavic 2 Pro boasts some of the best specs and features in the biz — including a Hasselblad camera, omni-directional obstacle avoidance, and a flurry of automated flight modes. If you’re looking for a go-anywhere, film-anything drone that you can fit inside a backpack, then look no further.

It also can’t handle itself outdoors, with the slightest breeze gusting it away (not only that, but because of how small it is, it’s easy to lose line of sight). Charging takes somewhere around 20 minutes with the usb charger, however you’ll need your own usb to wall adapter or a computer handy to plug it in. Unfortunately, unlike some other quacopters on this list, due to the size and engineering of this drone, repairs are extremely difficult, requiring a very tiny screwdriver to open it up, the solder pads for the motors are also tiny. Repairs aren’t impossible, but it is more difficult.

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