Registering is easy. If you have a toy drone, you probably don’t need to register it, but for those of you buying camera drones, here’s how it works. You just go to registermyuas.faa.gov, fill out a few important questions like what model drone you have, where you live, and your email address. Then you pay a small license fee, print out your new registration number, and attach it to your drone in a place where it can be seen.

If you're flying within the United States, you need to take heed of FAA guidelines—or be prepared to face potential fines or jail time. There are no-fly zones set by the FAA, so don't take off if you're near an airport without notifying the control tower first. And, even if you're out in the middle of nowhere, don't take your drone above 400 feet. Most are set to obey these regulations out of the box, but controlling a quadcopter is just like driving a car—even if you missed seeing that speed limit sign, you're still liable to pay the ticket.
To gauge flight performance, we put the drone through a number of tests to see how the manufacturer’s claims hold up. First we take it to a local football field and see how fast it can clear 100 yards, then do some calculations to get an objective reading on speed in miles per hour. After that, we do a similar test to assess ascent and descent speeds, and all the while, we’re also taking notes on how responsive the controls are, how stable the craft is, how far it can go before it’s out of range, and what the overall piloting experience is like compared to other drones.
The quality of the video captured by these drones is fine for flying them and it is good enough to post on social media. However, the video quality is not HD. This can easily be seen when playing the recorded video on a screen that is larger, like the typical laptop screen that is 1080p. Video that is 720p will look pixelated and fuzzy when viewed at full-screen size on a screen that is 1080p high. 
The other primary consideration is how the photos and video are stored after you take them. Drones with WiFi capabilities will work with your mobile device, letting you see and store media real-time on your phone. For those that don’t, you’ll store the media on the drone, usually on a microSD card. If this is the case, know how much storage the drone comes with and whether (and by how much) it can be upgraded.
This drone is based on a design that is a few years old, so it does not have an altitude hold function. However, it does feature a headless mode and a one-key return to pilot function. It can also perform flips at a push of a button, which is fun to watch and perform. To help with orientation with night flying, this drone has blue LEDs at the front, and red LEDs at the back.

Want to keep your budget below $300, we suggest you choose one of the Altair drones we recommend. Altair is a great company (learn about Altair) out of Nebraska and provides top notch customer service! Shop the Altair Outlaw which goes 1000+ meters and costs $279. Altair also offers the AA108 as a budget option at $129 and the 818 Hornet is a great mid range for ages 10-14 and $169.
There are a number of products on the market that are sold as drones, but don't quite fit the bill. Remote-controlled aircraft have been around for ages. (Check out this clip from Magnum, P.I. if you don't believe me, or just want to see Tom Selleck in a bathrobe.) But with the recent surge in popularity, quadcopters that would simply be sold as RC products are now being tagged as drones. These don't include GPS stabilization, return-to-home functionality, and other automated flight modes that make a drone a drone.

The Realtime FPV App Flyingsee is easy to download and connect to the video cam drone. You simply attach your phone to the remote controller in the provided phone holder, and with a simple wifi connection your ready to fly. The range of the video is around 50 Meters which is a little above average for most entry level FPV Drones. Without spending $500 or more, this is the best

Oh, and let’s not forget about the camera. In addition to a 12-megapixel camera that shoots video in 1080p at 30 frames per second, the Spark also sports a two-axis gimbal. This lets it mechanically stabilize the camera and cancel out any jarring, shaky movements — resulting in smoother, better-looking footage. This also gives it a leg up on the competition; most selfie drones only feature single-axis mechanical stabilization.
You can pair the Tello with a third-party gamepad controller, but it’s easy enough to fly using the simple, intuitive Tello app. Thanks to its link with DJI (the Tello’s flight controller is made by the drone manufacturer), it’s a great ‘first drone’ for kids or adults looking for a learner model to practice on before moving to a bigger quadcopter like the the DJI Mavic Air.
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