This guide will walk you through some of the features and capabilities you can expect to find in a drone under $100, in addition to some more general considerations when comparing UAVs. We also recommend several models, so you can spend more time learning to navigate around trees and less time worrying about finding a drone that matches your needs.
The most recent variant, the cx10c, is another small improvement over the other two. Again, it only adds one feature, but this time its a little bit more substantial, this time, they’ve added a camera. With a micro sd card you can watch videos of your flights from the perspective of the drone. It may not be a great camera, its not even a good camera, the footage is mediocre and would never compare even slightly to a high end multirotor, but for the price ($25) and the size (roughly the same as before) its amazing that it includes one.

This drone is a good option for those looking to upgrade from a toy drone to something more like a professional racing drone. It comes with headless mode and flip mode. Plus, the remote is clearly labeled so even if you’ve never picked up a drone remote before, you know exactly what’s going on. It has a range of about 230 feet, plenty of space for a more serious race. It’s well balanced and can handle a little bit of wind.
This drone seriously has it all. It’s powerful. It’s portable. It can dodge obstacles autonomously. And to top it all off, it has a camera that produces some of the best-looking aerial imagery we’ve ever seen. Truth be told, you can get a lot of these features in the original (and still very good) Mavic Pro, but the Mavic 2 Pro just does everything better.
Tello has a range of just over 300 feet, and despite its size, it produces stable and clear videos, courtesy of its dual antenna transmission. You can get a 720p HD quality video with 30 frames per second, and conveniently capture stills of up to five megapixels. Unfortunately, users can only save the recorded videos on the smartphone and not on a memory card. While you can access these clips almost instantly, it takes up all the space on your phone.
Irrespective of the dimensions of your quadcopter, they must not go higher than 400ft above the ground. Likewise, you must always maintain a clear line-of-sight with the machine at all times. You are also expected to adequately inspect your device before each flight session, to ensure its readiness and airworthiness. This is necessary to prevent unnecessary flight accidents.  
While DJI may be the first name you think of when it comes to drones, it isn't the only game in town. You can also look at models from Autel Robotics, Parrot, PowerVision, and Yuneec. Others have dabbled in the consumer drone space and exited quickly—GoPro pulled its Karma after a rocky launch and poor sales, and 3D Robotics tried to get in with the Solo, but also gave up the fight to focus on the industrial and enterprise spaces.
Although this HD Drone can be flown safely outside, make sure to avoid too much wind whenever possible. This is a lightweight drone, and as such it is susceptible to harsher weather conditions than some of the heavier, higher end drones. For hobbyists just itching to go out on blustery days when the wind is howling, try leaving the drone at home and taking a kite out instead.

Most drones are pretty easy to fly, but the controls will be slightly different depending on what kind of drone you get. Camera drones are the easiest drones to fly, while toy drones can be harder (because of their lack of sensors and flying aids). To fly a camera drone, people usually use a controller with their smartphone attached to it. The smartphone will let you see a live video feed and all of the most important flight data you need. Some drones like the DJI Mavic Air, DJI Spark, and Yuneec breeze allow you to fly just using your smartphone.
Most autopilot drones come with high-quality built-in cameras. Some have extremely advanced and professional features like adjustable aperture, zoom in and out, and time lapses. These are great for aerial photographers and their careers. However, drone pilots that love flying for a hobby will enjoy many 1080p HD cameras. The autopilot drones fly so smooth making it easy to capture stunning and clear footage every time.
Most autopilot drones come with high-quality built-in cameras. Some have extremely advanced and professional features like adjustable aperture, zoom in and out, and time lapses. These are great for aerial photographers and their careers. However, drone pilots that love flying for a hobby will enjoy many 1080p HD cameras. The autopilot drones fly so smooth making it easy to capture stunning and clear footage every time.
While it does not have a whole lot of features, Orientation mode is pretty useful. It ensures that your drone stays within connection range and won’t fly off on you. The LED lights are great for night flying, especially when the battery is low and you need to ground it quickly. It can do the basic flip approximately 1 meter off the ground to ensure it doesn’t collide.
A. FAA guidelines state that a pilot must maintain visual contact with the drone at all times. There is also a maximum height restriction of 400 feet. If a drone flies out of controller range, it should have the ability to return to a programmed home location. Some advanced drones can send back real-time video data to the controller, but most consumer-level models don’t have that capability.
Almost all of the models featured here have some safety features. Even the DJI Spark, which isn't built for long-distance flight, includes a GPS and automatic return-to-home functionality. If your control signal is interrupted, or if the battery gets down too low (most drones can only fly for about 25 minutes on a single battery charge), you drone will start to head back to its takeoff point and land.
The category is “Drones under $100,” so we already know what the ceiling is here. These drones start at less than $50, and at that price you’ll generally find models with a shorter range and flight time and fewer features. Most drones fall in the $60 to $100 range. At this price, a close examination of capabilities and feature sets will be necessary to determine which is right for you.
When a new pilot tries to jump into the radio controlled aircraft scene, they may be tempted by a more expensive drone and while more expensive drones are usually easier to fly and have excellent cameras, the fact of the matter is that an inexperienced pilot just isn’t ready for all that. They aren’t ready to pilot a large, heavy aircraft, one which could very easily break, cause property damage, or even injury to another person. The smart thing to do in this situation is find a drone within a reasonable budget, so you can learn how to fly. That’s why today we’re bringing you this detailed guide of the best drones under $100.

If you’re searching for an amazing professional autopilot drone, the DJI Mavic 2 Pro is a great option. Aerial photographers are going to love this drone and its features. It comes equipped with a Hasselblad L1d-20c camera that produces stunning photo and video. It’s 3-axis gimbal technology paired with a maximum 30 minutes of flight time, create a smooth and stable flight every time.


For example, OPTI has a built-in Optiflow Sensor (a downward facing sensor), which functions by picking out the patterns on the ground to ensure that the drone maintains a straight position.  ATTI, conversely, works a bit differently. With the ATTI, the drone employs other techniques apart from the external sensors to keep the drone in the right orientation and altitude. Thus, the drone can hover in place, or drift slightly around with the wind serving as a push. You will also find a GPS in some drones, and they help the drone to maintain coordinated and precise flights and landings.
The word “drone” has taken on a few different meanings over the years. Some people think of a drone as a bee, others might think of those predator drones that the military uses. The drones that most people talk about today are simply radio controlled aircraft that have some level of autonomous features. A drone can be a plane, a helicopter, a quadcopter, or any combination in-between. Most of the drones sold today are quadcopters. They have 4 rotors and a flight controller that is used to stabilize the lift from the each propeller.
A. The law is a bit murky here in terms of licenses and registering of drones, and as such your best bet is to check local regulations and brush up on the latest requirements from the FAA. In general, you won’t need a license if you’re flying a drone recreationally and the drone weighs under 55 pounds. Anything heavier than that and you might need to register it. If you’re trying to earn money with your drone, you’ll need to be licensed. The FAA is more than willing to fine or even jail those who violate drone rules, so this is definitely not an area you should ignore.
Aside from its tiny and hyper-portable design, the Spark’s biggest feature is arguably its plethora of intelligent flying modes. In addition to DJI’s standard stuff, the Spark sports a handful of brand-new modes, including Rocket, Dronie, Circle, and Helix (more on those in a moment). The drone also comes with gesture recognition abilities, which allow it to be operated without a smartphone or controller.

You can pair the Tello with a third-party gamepad controller, but it’s easy enough to fly using the simple, intuitive Tello app. Thanks to its link with DJI (the Tello’s flight controller is made by the drone manufacturer), it’s a great ‘first drone’ for kids or adults looking for a learner model to practice on before moving to a bigger quadcopter like the the DJI Mavic Air.
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