The drones we review are ready-to-fly models, so you can use them right out of the box. In most cases, you'll need to bring your own Android or iOS device to view the camera feed in real-time, but we've reviewed a few models that stream video directly to a remote control. We don't cover racing, industrial, or agricultural aircraft here—our focus is on aircraft intended for aerial imaging and videography.
Most still cameras are 5 megapixels or higher. Therefore, do not be fooled by the claims of HD for a camera when the manufacturer is relying on the resolution for still photos. It is true what they are saying but not the complete story. Having HD resolution for still images does not explain the possibility of also having a lower quality for video-image capture. 
This guide will walk you through some of the features and capabilities you can expect to find in a drone under $100, in addition to some more general considerations when comparing UAVs. We also recommend several models, so you can spend more time learning to navigate around trees and less time worrying about finding a drone that matches your needs.

Truth be told, you can get a cheaper drone that your kid will probably go bonkers over just the same, but they’ll actually be able to fly this one. There are a boatload of mini drones out there right now that you can get for under $50 — but in our experience, the vast majority of them are too squirrelly and difficult to master for your average kid.
Often repainted and re-branded (sometimes at a much higher price) the Syma x5c is positioned at a competitive price for what you get in the box. For about $50+ shipping depending on where you order, you get the quadcopter itself, a transmitter, one battery, and a charger. Extra batteries are inexpensive and you’ll certainly want them if you plan to fly for longer than 6 minutes, but they charge quickly, which is nice. At 9 and a half inches diagonally motor to motor, its not small enough to fly indoors.

The word “drone” has taken on a few different meanings over the years. Some people think of a drone as a bee, others might think of those predator drones that the military uses. The drones that most people talk about today are simply radio controlled aircraft that have some level of autonomous features. A drone can be a plane, a helicopter, a quadcopter, or any combination in-between. Most of the drones sold today are quadcopters. They have 4 rotors and a flight controller that is used to stabilize the lift from the each propeller.


For both DJI drones, it's not necessary to go into depth about the basic functions, like take off, landing and navigating. You pay a premium, but these are definitely the top drones in the sky both because of their ease of use and extra features. On one battery, the Mavic flew for 21 minutes, in many different modes, speeds, and altitudes. The Tap to Fly feature on the Mavic was the biggest disappointment. The remote screen is too vague to simply place your finger where you want to go.

It’s good to have an idea of what you really want in these inexpensive drones before getting any of them for yourself, particularly considering that many people make impulse purchases of these drones over 50 due to their affordability and end up regretting later. Additionally, ensure that your device is equipped with all the necessary functions for easy flying, such as a dedicated remote control and updated operating software. Other factors to consider when buying the best drones under 100 (over 50) include the following.
Many autopilot drones come with multiple flight-modes. Common flight-modes seen in autopilot drones include a follow-me mode, sport mode, and one-touch takeoff and landing modes. They all serve different purposes and create different flight experiences. Follow-me modes allow the drone to follow you as you move and keep you in the frame. This enables you to create complex shots. Sport modes all your autopilot drone to go faster and follow targets such as cars or bikes. One-touch takeoff and landing are important flight modes as they allow for smooth landings and takeoffs with the push of a button. This is a great feature for beginners and pros alike.
The Holy Stone HS200, a cheap drone with camera is a beginner level best drone under $100. It will be easy to operate and has four levels of speed and a function of automatic takeoff and automatic landing. The most important thing is that you have a FIRST PERSON VIEW 1280 snapshot and a 720 video camera. The Holy Stone HS200 remote transmitter has features of a small LCD that can be used to adjust the transmitter’s configuration. The accelerator is used to control the flight of the drone and can also be released to allow the flight of the drone at a single point. The drone can be adjusted through 4-speed mode, beginners or experts, it does not matter, you will find the level of speed that most excites you. This drone can fly at night with the LED light that is attached for clear visibility. Its range of video transmitter is approximately 50-100 meters and, although it has a low resolution, many users have noticed that the images are of high quality. 2MP HD FPV camera, users appreciate the fact that they can use it for photography, as it offers bright and sharp photos, primarily if you use the Altitude hold functions.
The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.
Parrot’s new Mambo is different. Unlike most other mini drones, this one is actually designed specifically for kids. In addition to a boatload of motion sensors and advanced autopilot software that keeps the drone stable, Mambo also comes with a handful of attachments that make it more fun and engaging than a basic quadcopter. Inside the box you’ll find a cannon attachment, 50 foam cannon balls, and a grabber arm that can clamp and carry small objects.
Unfortunately, this one doesn’t come with a controller, which means you’re forced to pilot Tello via virtual joysticks on a smartphone app: a control method that’s notoriously mushy and imprecise. The good news, though, is that Ryze built the drone with third-party peripherals in mind, so if you prefer to fly with physical sticks under your thumbs, you can pick up a GameSir T1d controller and link it to your bird. We think it’s well worth the extra $30 bucks!
Another one of the great drone on this list with the beginner in mind, the UDI 818A HD Drone is electric powered, radio controlled, and equipped with six gyroscopes for stabilization. Although it can take a decent beating, it is recommended that this drone not be flown above asphalt or concrete, as it is still made of plastic, and can break if improperly used.
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