Often repainted and re-branded (sometimes at a much higher price) the Syma x5c is positioned at a competitive price for what you get in the box. For about $50+ shipping depending on where you order, you get the quadcopter itself, a transmitter, one battery, and a charger. Extra batteries are inexpensive and you’ll certainly want them if you plan to fly for longer than 6 minutes, but they charge quickly, which is nice. At 9 and a half inches diagonally motor to motor, its not small enough to fly indoors.
Unfortunately, this one doesn’t come with a controller, which means you’re forced to pilot Tello via virtual joysticks on a smartphone app: a control method that’s notoriously mushy and imprecise. The good news, though, is that Ryze built the drone with third-party peripherals in mind, so if you prefer to fly with physical sticks under your thumbs, you can pick up a GameSir T1d controller and link it to your bird. We think it’s well worth the extra $30 bucks!
The other primary consideration is how the photos and video are stored after you take them. Drones with WiFi capabilities will work with your mobile device, letting you see and store media real-time on your phone. For those that don’t, you’ll store the media on the drone, usually on a microSD card. If this is the case, know how much storage the drone comes with and whether (and by how much) it can be upgraded.
There are various factors you should take note of when shopping for these particular machines. First, you need to check the control operating system to ensure that it’s easy and manageable to use. Basically, there are 3 main control functions you can choose from which include OPTI, ATTI, and GPS, though they all help in flight-stabilization and assistance they tend to do it in slightly different ways.
The Yuneec Typhoon H is an innovative and exciting autopilot drone. It goes beyond traditional quadcopters and offers great features that consumers love. It has a noteworthy CGO3+ gimbal camera with a 360° range of motion that offers manual camera settings while in flight. This drone has professional quality features but is sold at a consumer price. There are a handful of flight modes to use for added stability and exploration. You can set your drone to orbit a circular path around you as you fly as well as setting points of interest so your Typhoon will automatically orbit a subject of your choice. There are follow me features that allow your drone to move with you and easy return to home for easy landing right near you.

Nevertheless, no matter the dimensions of your craft it’s not permissible for hobbyist drone users to fly their machines over 400ft above the ground, plus you’re required to always maintain a clear line-of-sight with the machine at all times. Furthermore, it’s your duty to carefully inspect the device before each flight session to ensure that it’s airworthy so as to avoid unnecessary accidents. Generally, the best drones under 100 (over 50) weigh less than 0.55lbs, but it’s your duty to ensure that you fly responsibly.


Many manufacturers mount cameras inside the body of the drone. This is acceptable for casual photography, but if you want more professional results, consider adding an external camera mount, or gimbal. Gimbals allow you to place your video or still camera in front of the drone body, away from the vibrating motor and rotors. Gimbals can swivel and pivot, providing you with additional control over your imagery.
The other primary consideration is how the photos and video are stored after you take them. Drones with WiFi capabilities will work with your mobile device, letting you see and store media real-time on your phone. For those that don’t, you’ll store the media on the drone, usually on a microSD card. If this is the case, know how much storage the drone comes with and whether (and by how much) it can be upgraded.
There is a wide variety of full-featured drones now available for less than $100. While you won’t get the range or feature set of a more expensive option, an inexpensive drone is the perfect choice if you’re just starting out. It’s generally easier to operate than its pricier counterparts yet sturdy enough to withstand a variety of novice pilot mishaps. The majority also pack features that you might be surprised to find at this price point.

Getting the best drone in the market can be quite tricky, especially when the low prices are comfortable.  Thus, it is important that you first identify the features you expect in your drone.  We will recommend that you get a drone that packs all the required functions for easy flying, including updated operating software and remote control, among others.  
For a beginner, there are a few drones that stand out on this list, but the drone you get heavily depends on what kind of beginner you are. If you’re looking at getting into drones because you like flying things and you want something to learn on, the Bugs 3 is a great choice. If you’re just looking for something to fly for fun around the house and bash around, you will probably want to look at the Mambo FPV.
Many manufacturers mount cameras inside the body of the drone. This is acceptable for casual photography, but if you want more professional results, consider adding an external camera mount, or gimbal. Gimbals allow you to place your video or still camera in front of the drone body, away from the vibrating motor and rotors. Gimbals can swivel and pivot, providing you with additional control over your imagery.

One of the most useful features of this drone that makes it great for beginners is how stable it remains while in the air. It even has a no-tip function to allow for an even smoother fly. This is the best small drone for less than $100, for the beginner looking to experiment with a fast, versatile, and extremely smooth flying drone at a shockingly affordable price. It comes with a 2.4ghz transmitter, spare propellers, and a USB charging cable, charges in forty minutes, and offers a decent amount of flight time averaging out at nine minutes.

I placed a request on Volunteermatch, where organizations connect with potential volunteers. The link for this is https://www.volunteermatch.org/search/index.jsp?k=drone&searchOpps=&v=false&categories=37&categories=37&s=1&o=distanceBand&l=Seattle%2C+WA%2C+USA&r=20&sk=&specialGroupsData.groupSize=&na=&partner=&usafc=#k=drone&v=false&categories=37&categories=37&s=1&o=distanceBand&l=Seattle%2C+WA%2C+USA&r=20&sk=&specialGroupsData.groupSize=&na=&partner=&usafc=’’ defer onload=’ defer onload=’
I placed a request on Volunteermatch, where organizations connect with potential volunteers. The link for this is https://www.volunteermatch.org/search/index.jsp?k=drone&searchOpps=&v=false&categories=37&categories=37&s=1&o=distanceBand&l=Seattle%2C+WA%2C+USA&r=20&sk=&specialGroupsData.groupSize=&na=&partner=&usafc=#k=drone&v=false&categories=37&categories=37&s=1&o=distanceBand&l=Seattle%2C+WA%2C+USA&r=20&sk=&specialGroupsData.groupSize=&na=&partner=&usafc=’’ defer onload=’ defer onload=’
This is the drone you start with if you're worried about crashing. Thanks to flexible plastic and propellor protectors, you could drop this on the ground or fly into a wall without too much damage. It has a camera if you are just getting into drone photography, but we prefer this model as a starter quadcopter. Beware: when it has low battery, the drone tends to lose connection with the controller. This could become tragic if you've flown the drone over water.
There is an altitude hold function that allows you to take aerial shots by releasing the throttle.  Once the throttle is released, the drone hovers in place and take the shot. As a beginner, the headless mode will help you to understand the capabilities of the drone better. Once you’ve gotten conversant with the features, you can do aerial tricks and flips with the drone.
When taking all of the specifications of the Smya X5C1 Quadcopter in mind, it is a drone best suited for the true beginner as a good starting drone. It can also be for those interested in experimenting with some light photography, or casual indoor or night flying. Other than the short battery life, this drone has it all, and remains one of the best drones for anyone interested in seeing just what drones are all about. The Syma X5C-1 a great starter drone with a camera in our opinion. The Syma is also an excellent drone to learn to fly.

This guide will walk you through some of the features and capabilities you can expect to find in a drone under $100, in addition to some more general considerations when comparing UAVs. We also recommend several models, so you can spend more time learning to navigate around trees and less time worrying about finding a drone that matches your needs.
Most drones are pretty easy to fly, but the controls will be slightly different depending on what kind of drone you get. Camera drones are the easiest drones to fly, while toy drones can be harder (because of their lack of sensors and flying aids). To fly a camera drone, people usually use a controller with their smartphone attached to it. The smartphone will let you see a live video feed and all of the most important flight data you need. Some drones like the DJI Mavic Air, DJI Spark, and Yuneec breeze allow you to fly just using your smartphone.
You can pair the Tello with a third-party gamepad controller, but it’s easy enough to fly using the simple, intuitive Tello app. Thanks to its link with DJI (the Tello’s flight controller is made by the drone manufacturer), it’s a great ‘first drone’ for kids or adults looking for a learner model to practice on before moving to a bigger quadcopter like the the DJI Mavic Air.
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