While it may be slightly more expensive than the previous drone we've already looked at, the Yanni Syma X5UW is quite possibly a top beginner drone currently on the market. As one of the few cheap drones with FPV capabilities, the Yanni by Syma is a great drone for the tech junkie and VR enthusiast alike. With its downloadable app, "SYMA GO", flying is both simple and fun. By drawing a route on the screen with your fingertips, the drone's autopilot will read it and follow the given path. This is possibly one of the best features of the Yanni Syma, as it is a drone that can be flown without the aid of a transmitter.
Almost all of the models featured here have some safety features. Even the DJI Spark, which isn't built for long-distance flight, includes a GPS and automatic return-to-home functionality. If your control signal is interrupted, or if the battery gets down too low (most drones can only fly for about 25 minutes on a single battery charge), you drone will start to head back to its takeoff point and land.
Even if you have no good reason to justify buying one, you have to admit that drones are cool. Some are glorified tech toys, but most models we highlight here are fit for use in imaging and cinematic applications small and large. If you think you can use a flying camera in your next project, there's some good news—the tech has come a long way in a very short time. There are models on the market now that put earlier copters to shame in terms of video quality and stabilization.
The other reason we love this drone is that it’s not super complicated to fly or maintain, so it’s a great choice for beginners and pros alike. Even if you’ve never raced a drone before in your life, you’ll likely be able to learn the ropes with a Draco after just a few hours of practice. Alternatively, if you already have some FPV racing experience under your belt, you’ll feel right at home with this rig.
Speedy and nimble, the Mavic Air is great fun to use beyond its image-capture abilities – though these are stellar, too. The 1/2.3-inch CMOS sensor sits on a three-axis mechanical gimbal that reduces vibrations and ensures silky smooth footage, with 4K video at 30fps offering plenty of detail. It’s only in low-light that you’ll notice it struggling.
This section could also be labeled “How long will the flight last?” Battery life/flight time isn’t that great for drones in general, but in drones at this price a flight time of less than ten minutes is common. A low-battery warning on the remote/controller will give you a heads-up when the battery is running low so you know when to bring the drone in for a landing. Research how long a charged battery will last, as well as how long it will take to recharge. Most drone batteries take from one to two hours to fully recharge.
The category is “Drones under $100,” so we already know what the ceiling is here. These drones start at less than $50, and at that price you’ll generally find models with a shorter range and flight time and fewer features. Most drones fall in the $60 to $100 range. At this price, a close examination of capabilities and feature sets will be necessary to determine which is right for you.
Another one of the great drone on this list with the beginner in mind, the UDI 818A HD Drone is electric powered, radio controlled, and equipped with six gyroscopes for stabilization. Although it can take a decent beating, it is recommended that this drone not be flown above asphalt or concrete, as it is still made of plastic, and can break if improperly used.
×