Overall you can’t go wrong if you’re looking for in the toy drone section with something for a camera to play with. The HD 720p camera takes great video and pictures. The price is right at under $130.00 amazon, and really the customer service is the kicker. No other drone company we’ve spoken to has displayed such dedication to making sure their customers are happy.

The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.
DJI models currently dominate our top picks, and there's a good reason for that. The company is simply a few steps ahead of its competition right now, and has a product catalog with models at various price points, which take up a good number of the slots in our top ten. It made a huge splash with its iconic Phantom series, and now makes the best small drones we've tested in the form of the Mavic series.
Naturally, there are a couple of downsides to a drone being this small – it’s not particularly happy when flying in breezy conditions and the battery life is barely longer than ten minutes. Still, while the body is made of plastic, it’s tough enough so survive some crashes and, in the right conditions, the Tello is an impressively stable and responsive flyer.

Altitude Hold allows a drone to maintain a consistent altitude by analyzing the pressure data further provided by a drone’s barometric pressure sensor. If a drone has an ultrasonic sensor, this is also used with Altitude Hold. This feature ensures even a small drone with camera will be able to hold itself in place while you snap some shots or record a video.
If the drone we’re testing happens to have a camera capable of recording, we capture as much footage as we possibly can. We’ll shoot in dark places, light places, and places with lots of color and contrast. This footage is then compared to all the highlight reels that we filmed with other drones, which helps us get a sense of the camera’s strengths and weaknesses. We also test any accessories that accompany the camera, like lenses, filters, gimbals, or FPV goggles. Finally, we’ll also let you know if the camera setup is upgradable, so you wont be stuck with an outdated shooter in two years.
Another big addition is Spark’s obstacle avoidance system. While the ability to sense and avoid objects is usually a feature reserved for larger drones, DJI went ahead and built one into the hull of the Spark. It’s not quite as robust as what you’ll find on the Phantom 4, or even the Mavic Pro, but it still serves its purpose, and helps you avoid crashes.
Blade itself says the QX is for intermediate pilots, but this is the ultimate beginner quadcopter that can probably take any user to all the way of some pretty advanced flying. In addition to this factor, it’s almost double the price of other Nanos, which are great in their own right, but the drone of this capability has an immense brand appeal and reflects the quality Blade has put into its craft over the years. Blade also offers a BNF or “bind and fly” version of the QX in case a purchaser wants to use it with their existing radio transmitter, and there are some value packs around that will give them spare props and extra batteries for a reasonable price. Although the drone in its act- is very nimble, it comes with special safe technology that decreases control input speeds and automatically hovers the drone so that it becomes perfect for someone just starting out. In fact, it’s even better than that. You can play safely, in contrast to that, once someone is ready to control the drone, the safe mode can be kept on but double the control rate, so it will start hovering and the drone is still automatic, but pitching, yawing, and rolling are much more responsive when the safe mode is enabled. In another mode, the agility mode the user will get the full, crazy manual experience. Here, the user will have to hover the craft, he/she will have to figure out flips and rolls. People can sometime complain that the prop guard design tends to hook on stuff, so there’s that, but the actual crash durability of the quad is pretty good, going by the people who have actually crashed it. So, to sum up about this drone, it is a drone with many promises to undergo with and the user will have many usage of the drone when they will be upon an interesting experience of running a drone on their own.
Almost all of the models featured here have some safety features. Even the DJI Spark, which isn't built for long-distance flight, includes a GPS and automatic return-to-home functionality. If your control signal is interrupted, or if the battery gets down too low (most drones can only fly for about 25 minutes on a single battery charge), you drone will start to head back to its takeoff point and land.
Naturally, there are a couple of downsides to a drone being this small – it’s not particularly happy when flying in breezy conditions and the battery life is barely longer than ten minutes. Still, while the body is made of plastic, it’s tough enough so survive some crashes and, in the right conditions, the Tello is an impressively stable and responsive flyer.
This drone seriously has it all. It’s powerful. It’s portable. It can dodge obstacles autonomously. And to top it all off, it has a camera that produces some of the best-looking aerial imagery we’ve ever seen. Truth be told, you can get a lot of these features in the original (and still very good) Mavic Pro, but the Mavic 2 Pro just does everything better.
I placed a request on Volunteermatch, where organizations connect with potential volunteers. The link for this is https://www.volunteermatch.org/search/index.jsp?k=drone&searchOpps=&v=false&categories=37&categories=37&s=1&o=distanceBand&l=Seattle%2C+WA%2C+USA&r=20&sk=&specialGroupsData.groupSize=&na=&partner=&usafc=#k=drone&v=false&categories=37&categories=37&s=1&o=distanceBand&l=Seattle%2C+WA%2C+USA&r=20&sk=&specialGroupsData.groupSize=&na=&partner=&usafc=’’ defer onload=’ defer onload=’
All of these multirotors include the essentials; a battery, charger, remote (more commonly referred to as a transmitter), and of course the quadcopter itself. All of these are controlled using a standard mode 2 style transmitter with the throttle on the left and adjustable trim settings. They all also handle using the same basic control scheme and the same basic auto-leveling flight mode, but much like a car, they all feel distinctly different to control.
You can pair the Tello with a third-party gamepad controller, but it’s easy enough to fly using the simple, intuitive Tello app. Thanks to its link with DJI (the Tello’s flight controller is made by the drone manufacturer), it’s a great ‘first drone’ for kids or adults looking for a learner model to practice on before moving to a bigger quadcopter like the the DJI Mavic Air.
The drones we review are ready-to-fly models, so you can use them right out of the box. In most cases, you'll need to bring your own Android or iOS device to view the camera feed in real-time, but we've reviewed a few models that stream video directly to a remote control. We don't cover racing, industrial, or agricultural aircraft here—our focus is on aircraft intended for aerial imaging and videography.

This FPV drone focuses more on the actual drone than it does the camera aspects, however, considering you get more features and capabilities. You can use a FPV real time HD live transmission with your mobile device using the FPV WiFi feature, have Headless mode, a low voltage alarm, 360-degree flips, and gravity induction that allows you to fly at all angles and in every direction.
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