DJI models currently dominate our top picks, and there's a good reason for that. The company is simply a few steps ahead of its competition right now, and has a product catalog with models at various price points, which take up a good number of the slots in our top ten. It made a huge splash with its iconic Phantom series, and now makes the best small drones we've tested in the form of the Mavic series.
Registering is easy. If you have a toy drone, you probably don’t need to register it, but for those of you buying camera drones, here’s how it works. You just go to registermyuas.faa.gov, fill out a few important questions like what model drone you have, where you live, and your email address. Then you pay a small license fee, print out your new registration number, and attach it to your drone in a place where it can be seen.

The Tello is a brand new quadcopter from the world’s biggest drone company, and it retails for only $99 USD. Technically it’s a joint venture between DJI and Rize, but the important thing is that you’re getting a high-quality product for dirt cheap. A 5 Megapixel camera, 8 dimensional flips, a “throw and go” flight mode, and HD video can all be yours today – learn more by reading our full review here.

For those looking for a basic done that has FPV camera capabilities that are still pretty decent, but at a fair price, the Hubsan H502S is definitely the way to go. There are minimal features, mostly just the GPS function, which is a nice touch that makes all the difference, and you get up to 12 minutes of flying time on a single charge. You also get Return to Home, Follow Me, one-key control, the whole set.
Yuneec also has a model with a Micro Four Thirds camera. Its Tornado H920 is a huge drone with six rotors and room to hold three batteries, giving it an unheard of 42-minute flight capability. Its CGO4 camera is essentially a custom version of the Panasonic GH4, a favorite of many a terrestrial videographer. It doesn't record uncompressed video like the Inspire 2, but it's less expensive.
This drone seriously has it all. It’s powerful. It’s portable. It can dodge obstacles autonomously. And to top it all off, it has a camera that produces some of the best-looking aerial imagery we’ve ever seen. Truth be told, you can get a lot of these features in the original (and still very good) Mavic Pro, but the Mavic 2 Pro just does everything better.
This drone is a good option for those looking to upgrade from a toy drone to something more like a professional racing drone. It comes with headless mode and flip mode. Plus, the remote is clearly labeled so even if you’ve never picked up a drone remote before, you know exactly what’s going on. It has a range of about 230 feet, plenty of space for a more serious race. It’s well balanced and can handle a little bit of wind.
These drones are marketed towards beginners because they are really cheap. However, these drones are not the easiest drones on the market to fly. Higher-priced drones, with the ability to use GPS coordinates and that have onboard obstacle detection and collision avoidance, are much easier to fly than these drones. You will have to spend in the range of $200 to $300 to get these advanced features for a drone; however, you may ultimately be happier if you do this than if you lose or crash one of these drones. 
As it is for every gadget out there, a buyer must set realistic expectations when buying a cheap drone (or other devices).  If you set expectations that are too high, chances of being disappointed ultimately are high, and this may ruin your drone flying experience.  Instead of the high standards, expect far less from the device and let it surprise you instead while providing you with so much excitement in the process.  You may consider buying a spare drone also.
A. The law is a bit murky here in terms of licenses and registering of drones, and as such your best bet is to check local regulations and brush up on the latest requirements from the FAA. In general, you won’t need a license if you’re flying a drone recreationally and the drone weighs under 55 pounds. Anything heavier than that and you might need to register it. If you’re trying to earn money with your drone, you’ll need to be licensed. The FAA is more than willing to fine or even jail those who violate drone rules, so this is definitely not an area you should ignore.
It’s good to have an idea of what you really want in these inexpensive drones before getting any of them for yourself, particularly considering that many people make impulse purchases of these drones over 50 due to their affordability and end up regretting later. Additionally, ensure that your device is equipped with all the necessary functions for easy flying, such as a dedicated remote control and updated operating software. Other factors to consider when buying the best drones under 100 (over 50) include the following.
One of the most useful features of this drone that makes it great for beginners is how stable it remains while in the air. It even has a no-tip function to allow for an even smoother fly. This is the best small drone for less than $100, for the beginner looking to experiment with a fast, versatile, and extremely smooth flying drone at a shockingly affordable price. It comes with a 2.4ghz transmitter, spare propellers, and a USB charging cable, charges in forty minutes, and offers a decent amount of flight time averaging out at nine minutes.
For example, OPTI has a built-in Optiflow Sensor (a downward facing sensor), which functions by picking out the patterns on the ground to ensure that the drone maintains a straight position.  ATTI, conversely, works a bit differently. With the ATTI, the drone employs other techniques apart from the external sensors to keep the drone in the right orientation and altitude. Thus, the drone can hover in place, or drift slightly around with the wind serving as a push. You will also find a GPS in some drones, and they help the drone to maintain coordinated and precise flights and landings.
The other primary consideration is how the photos and video are stored after you take them. Drones with WiFi capabilities will work with your mobile device, letting you see and store media real-time on your phone. For those that don’t, you’ll store the media on the drone, usually on a microSD card. If this is the case, know how much storage the drone comes with and whether (and by how much) it can be upgraded.
Most autopilot drones come with high-quality built-in cameras. Some have extremely advanced and professional features like adjustable aperture, zoom in and out, and time lapses. These are great for aerial photographers and their careers. However, drone pilots that love flying for a hobby will enjoy many 1080p HD cameras. The autopilot drones fly so smooth making it easy to capture stunning and clear footage every time.
Truth be told, you can get a cheaper drone that your kid will probably go bonkers over just the same, but they’ll actually be able to fly this one. There are a boatload of mini drones out there right now that you can get for under $50 — but in our experience, the vast majority of them are too squirrelly and difficult to master for your average kid.

As it is for every gadget out there, a buyer must set realistic expectations when buying a cheap drone (or other devices).  If you set expectations that are too high, chances of being disappointed ultimately are high, and this may ruin your drone flying experience.  Instead of the high standards, expect far less from the device and let it surprise you instead while providing you with so much excitement in the process.  You may consider buying a spare drone also.


While DJI may be the first name you think of when it comes to drones, it isn't the only game in town. You can also look at models from Autel Robotics, Parrot, PowerVision, and Yuneec. Others have dabbled in the consumer drone space and exited quickly—GoPro pulled its Karma after a rocky launch and poor sales, and 3D Robotics tried to get in with the Solo, but also gave up the fight to focus on the industrial and enterprise spaces.
It also can’t handle itself outdoors, with the slightest breeze gusting it away (not only that, but because of how small it is, it’s easy to lose line of sight). Charging takes somewhere around 20 minutes with the usb charger, however you’ll need your own usb to wall adapter or a computer handy to plug it in. Unfortunately, unlike some other quacopters on this list, due to the size and engineering of this drone, repairs are extremely difficult, requiring a very tiny screwdriver to open it up, the solder pads for the motors are also tiny. Repairs aren’t impossible, but it is more difficult.
After we’ve taken the drone out to play for a while and jotted down a few notes about how long the battery lasts, we put it on the charger and grab a stopwatch to determine recharge time. Then we take it back out and do a hover test. By flying the drone in the least demanding conditions, we can get a sense of what the maximum flight time is. And finally, we take it out a few more good, hard flights to find out how long the battery lasts (on average) under normal conditions.

The included 3.7V 650 when fully charged, offers about 9 minutes of flying time, and you only need about an hour to refuel. If you wish to have the drone in action for an extended period, simply purchase additional batteries. With the controller, you have up to 120m of control range, but reduced to just 50m when you activate the FPV mode. Even with this, you can still conveniently take videos at reasonable distances.  

Another big addition is Spark’s obstacle avoidance system. While the ability to sense and avoid objects is usually a feature reserved for larger drones, DJI went ahead and built one into the hull of the Spark. It’s not quite as robust as what you’ll find on the Phantom 4, or even the Mavic Pro, but it still serves its purpose, and helps you avoid crashes.

Tello has a range of just over 300 feet, and despite its size, it produces stable and clear videos, courtesy of its dual antenna transmission. You can get a 720p HD quality video with 30 frames per second, and conveniently capture stills of up to five megapixels. Unfortunately, users can only save the recorded videos on the smartphone and not on a memory card. While you can access these clips almost instantly, it takes up all the space on your phone.
To gauge flight performance, we put the drone through a number of tests to see how the manufacturer’s claims hold up. First we take it to a local football field and see how fast it can clear 100 yards, then do some calculations to get an objective reading on speed in miles per hour. After that, we do a similar test to assess ascent and descent speeds, and all the while, we’re also taking notes on how responsive the controls are, how stable the craft is, how far it can go before it’s out of range, and what the overall piloting experience is like compared to other drones.
Because some drones can carry small payloads, such as still and video cameras, many photographers have added them to their equipment arsenal. For example, a wedding photographer can capture a panoramic or overhead shot by flying a camera-equipped drone over the wedding location. An amateur filmmaker can create pro-like crane shots and close-ups by using a drone with a stabilizer.
Generally speaking, drones that cost less than $100 bucks aren’t worth your time. They’re flimsy, they lack advanced features, and they’re almost always squirrely as hell in the air. But Tello is different. Despite the fact that it retails for only $99, it boasts a boatload of high-end features and functionality. Under the hood you’ll find a 14-core Intel vision processing chip, flight stabilization tech from DJI, a 5 megapixel camera capable of shooting 720p HD video, and a battery that gets you 13 minutes of flight time. 

best drones under 100 amazon

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